Growing Pains Vol 2 with 2 Small Biz Guys

Growing Pains Vol 2 with 2 Small Biz Guys

Growing Pains Vol 2

We pick up the conversation and continue with the analysis of Growing Pains for Organizations. The next set of factors include discussions about how we think about meetings, the function of follow-up in planning exercises and the nature of security within a firm. In the process, we lost Ray for a bit, calling in from Chicago. While waiting to re-establish contact, Zen went over some management principles and practices from Jack and Suzy Welch. You’ll find them helpful, too.

Tune in next week for a discussion with Gelie Ahkenblit, the Networking Phoenix Diva. We’ll explore the dynamics of networking. We’ve also got an event with Dave Sherman, The Art of Schmooze, coming up on November 11. You can find out more here.
Here’s a checklist to assess your company’s progress to accomplish.

First, preferred employers demonstrate a real commitment to continuous learning.

Second, preferred employers are meritocracies. Pay and promotions are tightly linked to performance, and rigorous appraisal systems consistently let people know where they stand. Why does this make a company a preferred employer? Very simply, because people with brains, self-confidence, and competitive spirit are always attracted to such environments.

Third, preferred employers not only allow people to take risks, they celebrate those who do, and don’t shoot those who fail trying. Next, preferred employers understand that what is good for society is also good for business. Preferred employers are diverse and global in their outlook and environmentally sensitive in their practices. They offer flexibility in work schedules to those who earn it with performance. In a word, preferred companies are enlightened.

Fourth, they keep their hiring standards tight. They make candidates work hard, requiring an arduous interview process and strict criteria around intelligence and previous experience.

Finally, preferred companies are profitable and growing. One of the most intoxicating things a company can say to a potential employee is, “Join us for the ride of your life.”

 

 

Share